What’s Going on With My Gums?

Have you ever removed your toothbrush from your mouth only to notice the bristles of your brush are tinted red? Don’t be alarmed! In many cases, bleeding gums can come seemingly out of nowhere, even If you don’t have an injury to your gums. But if your gums aren’t injured, why are they bleeding – and what can you do to stop them from bleeding in the future? Here are some common reasons your gums may bleed, even if there is no injury present.

Gingivitis / Periodontitis

Gums often bleed in people with any stage of gum disease due to inflammation of the gums. If you notice any bleeding when you brush, it could be gum disease – and your body’s way of telling you to brush and floss your teeth more, not less! If you do see redness on your brush, don’t panic. Many times, early-stage gum disease is completely reversible. Brushing and flossing regularly can turn early-stage gum disease around and stop the bleeding, so don’t give up hope, but do be sure to contact Dr. Lesko if you are concerned or if the bleeding doesn’t stop after a week or two.

New Oral Care Routine

Sometimes when you begin a new oral health routine – such as brushing more frequently or adding flossing – your gums will bleed for a few days until they are used to the new routine. As with gum disease, don’t give up on flossing and brushing because of the bleeding. Keep up the good work and the bleeding should stop after a few days. This may also occur with a new or too-hard-bristled toothbrush.

Hormones and Pregnancy

Sometimes women’s hormonal changes can make the gums more sensitive, especially during pregnancy. In fact, there is such a thing as “pregnancy gingivitis,” which usually clears up on its own after childbirth.

Blood Thinners

Patients taking blood thinners may bleed more easily and for longer periods of time than those not taking them. If you are on blood thinners and experience bleeding when you brush, don’t be alarmed but do contact your doctor just to be on the safe side.

To schedule an appointment with Dr. Lesko, please call 970-812-0355.